SURPRISING NEWS ABOUT THE SPREAD OF ALZHEIMER’S

Gina Kolata writes in the New York Times about two new fascinating studies that show Alzheimer’s disease spread like an infection from cell to cell in the brain. What’s surprising, she writes:

“Instead of viruses or bacteria, what is being spread is a distorted protein known as tau.
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In Alzheimer’s, a Tangled Protein
  The surprising finding answers a longstanding question and has immediate implications for developing treatments, researchers said. And they suspect that other degenerative brain diseases like Parkinson’s may spread in a similar way.
Alzheimer’s researchers have long known that dying, tau-filled cells first emerge in a small area of the brain where memories are made and stored. The disease then slowly moves outward to larger areas that involve remembering and reasoning.
But for more than a quarter-century, researchers have been unable to decide between two explanations. One is that the spread may mean that the disease is transmitted from neuron to neuron, perhaps along the paths that nerve cells use to communicate with one another. Or it could simply mean that some brain areas are more resilient than others and resist the disease longer.
The new studies provide an answer. And they indicate it may be possible to bring Alzheimer’s disease to an abrupt halt early on by preventing cell-to-cell transmission, perhaps with an antibody that blocks tau. “
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One response to “SURPRISING NEWS ABOUT THE SPREAD OF ALZHEIMER’S

  1. Pingback: We are NOT Individuals! We are a Community of Intelligent Cells « The Epigenetics Project Blog

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